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   G3NPF and M1AIM    

Welcome to the G3NPF & M1AIM Home Page

Photo of G3NPF and M1AIM 
 Tony G3NPF and Anne M1AIM
 Storrington, West Sussex, England
 QTH: IO90SW    QRA: ZK08F    WAB: TQ11
 ITU Zone 27    CQ Zone 14

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IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Following a recent major heart attack and cardiac arrest, Tony is currently not enjoying the best of health.  Consequently, the maintenance and regular updating of this web-site may not be carried out.  Some items, such as weather data, may not be up to date.

This web-site does not use cookies and no such files will be installed on your computer.

News of HARC and weather data for August added on September 1 2014



FACTS AND FIGURES

Map In 1999, we moved to a location which is now within the parish of Washington, close to the small town of Storrington.  There is a photo of our house in the Picture Gallery.  There are several other Radio Amateurs in this area but they do not appear to be very active.

This area is part of Horsham District and is covered by the parishes of Storrington, Sullington, Washington, Thakeham and Ashington.  Our house and the other properties in the immediate vicinity were originally located in the parish of Thakeham but were moved into the parish of Ashington in 1974.  However, they were re-located to the new Heath Common Ward of Washington Parish when the parish boundaries were again changed in 2003.  All these towns and villages are located in the county of West Sussex.

Our house is located in QTH Locator Square IO90SW and Great Britain is located in CQ Magazine's European Region, Zone 14 and ITU Region 1, Zone 27.  Select Locator and Zone Maps to view how these worldwide location systems compare.  All three are currently in use by the Amateur Radio Service, with the last of the three also applying to all other Radio Broadcasting and Communication Services.  Unfortunately there is no real compatibility between these systems.

A regularly updated map showing the QTH locator squares and countries worked by G3NPF on 50MHz is available by selecting the squares and countries worked map.  This map shows the squares and countries worked since moving to the present QTH in July 1999.

So you think you know the Q-Codes?  Then take a look at the list compiled by Jim, G4RGA, which gives the meanings of the 254 codes, out of a possible 676, that have been officially assigned meanings.  We have also included the 27 that have been assigned unofficial meanings by the ARRL, together with alternative meanings for 5 others defined by Robert Harris in his book "Enigma" and some groups used by the Russian Military and by the German Police.  There are three other "four-letter Q-Codes" that are not recognised in official lists but are used by the Amateur Radio Service and these are also included.  Some of the official codes have quite bizarre meanings, see QUQ, for example.

If you are interested in the codes used over commercial RTTY, facsimile and automatic high speed telegraphy links, have a look at the list of Z-Codes, compiled by Ralf, DL4TA.  This list includes the meanings of both the original Cable and Wireless codes, and the modern NATO codes.

There is also a full Morse Code listing.  The Amateur Radio Service is now the only officially recognised radio service still using the Morse code for communication on an every-day basis.  Although telephony and digital data modes are used by most amateurs, it is good that the "art" of using the Morse code is also being kept alive by many of them.  This listing includes the International Morse Code, the original American land-line telegraph Morse code, the old American Navy code, the codes for the Cyrillic (Russian), Greek, Hebrew and Arabic alphabets, the codes for accented letters used in European languages and in Esperanto, and various procedural signals.  There is also a brief note on the types of Morse keys that exist.

We have also included a section dealing with the Baudot (Murray) Code used by teleprinters.

If you want to know the meanings of the many abbreviations and expressions used on the Amateur Radio bands, there is a comprehensive, although not exhaustive, list of abbreviations and jargon, together with their meanings.  The list also includes details of phonetic alphabets and reporting systems.  A full list of emission designations is available.  There is also a list of the international Amateur Radio callsign prefixes.

If you would like to know how long a particular UK radio amateur has been licensed, and what the various UK callsign formats signify, go to the Licence Issue Date list.

We have now added a technical section to our web-site.  There are sub-sections relating to resistors, capacitors, inductors, transformers, attenuators, RF connectors and loads, antennas, feeders, matching circuits and standing wave ratio, together with guides to home construction, power measurement techniques and the nature and measurement of time and frequency.  We hope to add other sub-sections in the future.

We have also added a section on operating procedures, which includes advice on what to do, what not to do and what is actually illegal when operating on the amateur bands.

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Prior to 1.5.99, this Home Page was hosted by CompuServe, where it was visited over 850 times.  Currently, it is hosted by UK Secure Web Hosting, following withdrawal of web hosting services by Tesco.net.  The hits are now counted by

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Anne has a rain gauge and a max-min thermometer and we thought it might be of interest if we published the readings.  Beginning in March 2004, at the request of the Sandgate Conservation Society, we have also been recording the atmospheric pressure.  Charts show the previous month's data and we will try to update them at the beginning of each subsequent month.  Compilations of all the charts for 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 are also available.


Temperature chart for month Temperature chart for year

Rainfall chart for month Rainfall chart for year

Pressure chart for month Pressure chart for year

Select the appropriate year for compilation charts for 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

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   We are always scanning the Æther for  scanner  interesting items to add to these pages!


A.C.Wadsworth C.Eng. MIET G3NPF

 Photo of G3NPFI am a Chartered Engineer and a member of the Institution of Engineering and Technology and was employed by Thales Defence Limited (formerly, in reverse order, Thomson-CSF, Racal, Thorn-EMI, MEL-a division of Philips and EKCO Avionics) in Crawley, until I took early retirement at the end of March 2001.  I retired as a Senior Engineer / Project Leader, responsible for the design of navigation equipment for the Royal Navy and for some of the documentation relating to a project for the Royal Air Force.

I obtained my amateur radio licence in 1959 following eight years as a Short Wave Listener.  I have receive and transmit capabilities on all bands from 160 metres through to 23 cms, including the 60metre (5MHz) experimental band, using most analogue and digital modes except fast-scan television and the more esoteric types of communications.  The main antenna for 160m through to 10m, including 60m, 30m, 17m and 12m, is a Carolina Windom, matched by a homebrew "Picatune" remote auto ATU designed by G3XJP and described in a series of Radcom articles beginning in September 2000.  The standby HF antenna is an 18AVT-WB vertical, but this does not cover 160m, 60m or the WARC Bands.  I also have horizontal beams for 6m, 2m, 70cms and 23cms, together with outdoor verticals for 2m and 70cms and a halo for 4m in the loft.

Until a few years ago, my packet station was operational 24 hours a day, on a frequency of 144.900MHz, using a dedicated quarter-wave vertical antenna but e-mails and the Internet have all but killed off the use of packet, except for DX Clusters and Bulletin Boards.  Consequently, I no longer run the packet equipment continuously, although it is still available if required.  Having replaced dial-up with broadband, I now connect to the local packet cluster via the Internet.

When I was working, my main activities were confined to local working on 2 metres and 80 metres with occasional DX chasing on other bands, especially 6 metres.  However, now that I have retired, I am more active on the bands, using a variety of modes.  I still enjoy operating in HF contests with the local Amateur Radio Club.  I am currently "Station Master" of the Billingshurst and District Net (the BADNET), which meets at 10.00 hours local time, every Sunday morning and Christmas morning, on 3722kHz +/- the QRM.   This net has been in existence for well over 50 years and I have been Station Master for the last 40 years.  Although now effectively the Horsham Club Net, any station is welcome to join in.

In the early days, when I lived in Southend-on-Sea and belonged to the Southend and District Radio Society, all my equipment was home-brew, but I must admit that my main rigs are now Japanese black boxes.  However, I still use home-brew linear amplifiers on the HF bands (400W PEP), 6 metres (120W PEP), 4 metres (10W PEP), 2 metres (350W PEP), 70cms (250W PEP) and 23cms (10W PEP).  There is no need for a linear amplifier on 60 metres as the legal limit is 100W on that band (from January 1st 2013).  I was a Committee member of SDRS for over 12 years and subsequently served on the HARC Committee for 18 years.

My other main interests are computing, building model coal fired locomotives, visiting preserved railways, ancient buildings and industrial archeology sites and going to the pub, usually the White Lion at Thakeham.  Both Anne and I share an interest in full size steam railways such as the Bluebell Railway and we both belong to English Heritage and enjoy visiting their historical sites.  I also belong to the Mid-Sussex Model Engineering Club, which meets in Haywards Heath.  Their web site has only recently been set up and is consequently "under construction".  I am currently building a 3 1/2 inch gauge Britannia Class locomotive.  Regrettably, this project has not progressed very far over the last few years due to pressure from other activities and interests.  However, I have recently completed the building of a small Stuart Turner single cylinder vertical steam engine, photos of which are to be found in the Picture Gallery section of this web-site.  

I met Anne in 1991 when she knew nothing about Amateur Radio.  Fortunately, she found it interesting enough to study for her RAE and finally got her Class B licence in June 1996 with the callsign M1AIM.  She was trying to learn Morse but changes to the regulations have made this unnecessary and she now holds a Full Licence.  We are both members of the Horsham Amateur Radio Club and I am also a member of the Radio Society of Great Britain.  Anne and I live near to the small town of Storrington in West Sussex.

I was born in December 1939, in London, and subsequently attended Normanhurst School in Chingford and then Southend-on-Sea High School for Boys, having moved to Southend in 1951 with my parents.  I am a member of the Old Southendian Association.  After leaving school in 1956, I began work as an apprentice electronics engineer with E.K.Cole Ltd. and attended Southend Municipal College which subsequently became the Southend College of Technology and is now the Southend Campus of the South Essex College, where I obtained my qualifications.  I left Ekco Radio and Television in 1966 to work at the Marconi Company in Chelmsford, but returned to Ekco Avionics in 1967 and had nearly thirty four years continuous service until I retired, although the company name has changed many times over the years due to numerous mergers and take-overs.  I have a son and a daughter, three grand-children and one great-grand-child.

I had intended to retire in January or February 2000 but that was delayed due to one of the many company takeovers, which made it financially advantageous to stay on a little longer, although I did go "part-time" and only worked a four day week for the final year before eventually retiring in March 2001.  I had hoped that this would bring more time to indulge my many interests but I still seemed to run out of time to do everything.  Nothing has changed now that I have taken early retirement.  I still do not have enough time to do everything and now wonder how I ever managed to find time to go to work.  Anne and I have a half-acre garden, which takes some looking after and there is always something to do around the house.  I recently heard a very good definition of "retirement": you get up in the morning with nothing to do and go to bed at night having only done half of it!


 

A. Moore M1AIM

 Photo of M1AIMI retired in 2000, a year before Tony.  Prior to retirement, I was employed as the Domestic Supervisor at the Rikkyo School in England, a Japanese boarding school located between Horsham and Guildford.  I became interested in amateur radio after meeting Tony, G3NPF, and obtained my Class B licence in 1996.  I was intending to master the Morse Code and get a full licence, but changes in the licensing regulations have made learning Morse unnecessary.  My existing licence is now a Full Licence with the same privileges as Tony's.  In the 60s and 70s, I worked in Nigeria, Kenya and Saudi Arabia and have visited Australia and New Zealand.  I wish I had "discovered" amateur radio during that period as it would have been very interesting to have been able to use some rather exotic call-signs.

I was born in 1938, in Manchester, but spent most of my childhood and adolescent years in Edinburgh.  I attended James Gillespie's High School and Edinburgh College of Domestic Science, now Queen Margaret College.  I have two sons and a daughter and, so far, two grand-children and two step-grand-children.

I am a member of the Horsham Amateur Radio Club, and have assisted in contests by acting as a log-keeper but have done very little actual contest operating.  I am also a member of BYLARA and used to join their 80m and 40m nets before they were discontinued due to lack of support.  In the past, my operating was mainly confined to 2 metres, usually on FM but occasionally on SSB.  I have my own 2m multimode rig, which can be connected to either a vertical 5/8 wave ground-plane or a four element horizontally polarized beam.  However, now that I have a Full Licence, I am able to use Tony's high power gear and the main antennas on any Amateur Radio band.

My other interests are cross-stitch needlework, gardening, cooking, visiting preserved railways, ancient buildings and industrial archaeology sites and going to the pub, usually the White Lion at Thakeham, with Tony.  There is a photo of one of my cross-stitch samplers in the "pictures" section of this web-site.  Tony and I share an interest in full size steam railways such as the Bluebell Railway and we belong to English Heritage and enjoy visiting their historical sites.

Tony and I live near to the small town of Storrington in West Sussex.  Now that we have both retired, we thought we would have more time to enjoy mutual interests, although less money to spend on them.  The latter is unfortunately true but the former has not proved to be the case as we still find that there are not enough hours in the day.

I have recently had both knee joints and one hip joint replaced, which has curtailed many of my normal activities.  However, my recovery is virtually complete, which is just as well as Tony and I have a half-acre garden, which takes some looking after and there is always something to do around the house.  How did we find time to go to work?


LINKS TO A FEW AMATEUR RADIO AND OTHER SITES

ARRL                    American Radio Relay League.
Bluebell Railway        Preserved Steam Railway in East Sussex.
BYLARA                  British Young Ladies Amateur Radio Association.
CARC                    Crawley Amateur Radio Club.
CARG K4EEZ Clearwater Amateur Radio Group of Florida. DL4TA DL4TA's Home Page containing lots of interesting information. DX Cluster Internet access to the DX Cluster Network. Facebook The world's largest social networking site. Tony, Anne and HARC have a presence on Facebook. Go to Tony on Facebook. Go to Anne on Facebook. Go to HARC's Facebook Group. Fielden Maps An interesting site providing various map co-ordinate conversions. G3WZT G3WZT's Home Page (Member of HARC). G4LLI G4LLI's Home Page (Member of HARC). G4JHI G4JHI's Home Page (HARC Committee Member). G7KPF G7KPF's UK Amateur Radio Quick Links Page. GB3WS West Sussex and South West Surrey Repeater Group's web-site.
Google Arguably the best internet search engine. Greyline Propagation Display of World Greyline in real time. HARC Horsham Amateur Radio Club. Go to HARC's Facebook Group. IARU International Amateur Radio Union. IET Institution of Engineering and Technology. MSARS Mid-Sussex Amateur Radio Society. MSMEC Mid-Sussex Model Engineering Club. Nevada Supplier of Amateur Radio Equipment and sponsor of HARC News. OFCOM Office of Communications.  (The functions and powers of the Radio Communications Agency (RA) were transferred to OFCOM at the end of December 2003). QRZ QRZ call-sign database and amateur radio web site. RSGB Radio Society of Great Britain. TescoNet Internet Service Provider. UK Secure Web Hosting Host for this web site VA3LJR / VA3LYG Graham and Lynda's Home Page (Past members of HARC). WADARC Worthing and District Amateur Radio Club. The White Lion Our favourite pub, the White Lion at Thakeham.
WVARG Wey Valley Amateur Radio Group.

Select e-mail addresses for details of HARC members e-mail addresses.

If you would like your Web site included in this list, please send the details via .  Please note that in order to reduce the amount of "spam", we have reluctantly been forced to block all e-mails with addresses at msn, aol, hotmail, bigfoot, yahoo, lycos, compuserve and hundreds of other less well known domains, except those belonging to known "friends".  We apologise for any inconvenience.


LINKS TO HARC MEMBER'S E-MAIL ADDRESSES

Please note that e-mail addresses on this site are Java encoded to prevent the possibility of detection by spy-bots and similar spiders.  However, they will appear as normal to a legitimate user.  This list is not complete, as it only includes those members who have indicated that they do not object to being included.  If you are a member of HARC and would like your e-mail address removed from (or included in) this list, please send the details via .
  Brian       HARC member.
  Peter       HARC member. 
  Mike        Not a HARC member but a regular attendee on the BADNET. 
  Tony        HARC member  (See note below relating to blocked domains).
Robin HARC member.
Ron HARC member.
Bryn HARC member.
John HARC member.
Alister HARC Secretary.
Michael HARC member.
Mike HARC member.
David HARC member.
HARC Horsham Amateur Radio Club.
David HARC News-letter Editor  ( non-HARC mail).
Pete HARC member.
Graham HARC member.
Adrian HARC Chairman.
Paul HARC Treasurer (business address).
Steve HARC member.
Gavin HARC member.
Mike HARC member.
Andrew HARC member.
Ray HARC member.
Dominic HARC member.
Anne HARC member.
Alan HARC member and webmaster (Note that e-mails sent to this address will only be sent to HARC Facebook group members).

Select other sites for details of links to related web-sites.

Please note that in order to reduce the amount of "spam", we have reluctantly been forced to block all e-mails with addresses at msn, aol, hotmail, bigfoot, yahoo, lycos, compuserve and hundreds of other less well known domains, except those belonging to known "friends".  We apologise for any inconvenience.


LATEST NEWS

About G3NPF and M1AIM 

The picture of us both on the opening page of this web site was taken on the summit of Mount Snowdon during a holiday in North Wales.  We felt it was a more appropriate image than the previous one taken over twenty years ago, as we have now both retired and look somewhat older, or should we say more mature.  The old photo was taken in more formal circumstances at a party to celebrate Tony's completion of 25 years service with Thorn-EMI.  The photos on the personal profile pages are still the originals of twenty-one years ago.  However, over the past year, much has happened and both of us have suffered serious heath problems, especially Tony who suffered a major heart attack in May 2013 followed by a cardiac arrest.  We both now definitely look our ages.

Tony operates on the HF and VHF bands but Anne no longer joins the BYLARA nets on 40m as the activity is low or non-existent.  We have purchased a brand-new FTdx5000mp HF transceiver.  Tony has the necessary new NoV for operation on 5MHz and finds the activity has improved greatly following the release of more frequencies and the introduction of less stringent regulations on January 1st 2013.

Tony has been licensed for nearly 55 years and has also been a member of the RSGB for 55 years.  Hopefully, he will celebrate his 75th birthday in December 2014, assuming he survives that long.  Yes, it is that serious as, unfortunately, he recently suffered a serious heart attack and is finding full recovery to be a slow process.  The heart attack has left him with severe oedema, resulting in breathing problems, leg ulcers and serious mobility issues.  He now has to use a walking frame around the house and for short walks and a wheel chair for longer distances.  We have also had a stair lift installed as negotiating the stairs unassisted is a complete "no-no".

Anne has held her licence for 18 years and is nearly 76 years old.  She also has mobility and other health problems, but they are not as bad as Tony's.  It is therefore not surprising that our enthusiasm is not as great as it was!

Tony's model and other engineering projects continue spasmodically, as do Anne's needlework activities.  Tony has acquired a small (Telco/Boley 6.5mm) watchmakers lathe to compliment his Myford ML7.  This machine was obtained via Ebay and is small and portable enough to keep in the shack.  It is quite old but is in superb condition with no obvious wear and came with a counter-shaft assembly, a motor with foot-operated speed control and an enormous range of other accessories and extras.

We are both on Facebook in order to keep in touch with family members at home and abroad and with many of our friends.  However, for some unknown reason, Facebook "freezes" our computers and we have not yet found a solution.  It could be caused by the extreme antiquity of our PCs, although it is a common problem acording to the varios on-line forums!!

Last summer's crop of Victoria plums was very good, with several pounds of fruit having been eaten.  The pear crop was fairly good and the 11 year old greengage tree actually produced some fruit for the second time.  In the autumn of 2009, we planted four more fruit trees, a greengage, an apple, a plum and a cherry.  All have now survived four winters and are growing well.  This year, we might even get some fruit from them as they have all produced blossom.

Anne's gardening activities have been curtailed following operations to replace both knee joints and a hip joint.  One knee operation was very successful, although full recovery from the second knee operation took much longer than expected and the consultant performed a second operation in October 2011, which was succesful.  The hip replacement operation was carried out on 18th May 2012 and was successful.  Anne is able to drive and has regained some mobility, although she is a little slower than before.  As Tony has recently suffered a serious heart attack and dislikes gardening anyway, it looks as if horticultural activities will be limited to grass and hedge cutting by a contractor, until Anne's enthusiasm for gardening returns.

There were about eighty fish in the garden pond and we saw two newts but no frogs in 2012.  There are currently about one hundred fish, so it seems there has been some "activity" this spring.  So far this year we have seen one newt but no frogs or spawn. We have lost at least one fish to the activities of herons but Tony has now installed a new floating net system to deter them.

About Horsham Amateur Radio Club

Visit the HARC Home Page for details of club meetings, local events, club members, etc.  There are histories of HARC and the BADNET (the de facto Club Net) in the "Odds and Ends" section of this web-site.

The Club Championship contest is now divided into two sections, one for contest groups and clubs with members located throughout the country (General Section) and the other for "local" clubs (Local Section).

The 2014 Club Championship contest has now ended, with HARC finishing in 2nd position in the Local Section, out of a total of 37 participating clubs.

HARC entered two teams in the 2013 RSGB Club Calls Contest, as shown below, and achieved 5th place for HARC "A" and 37th place for HARC "B".

HARC "A" Individual Callsign Total
Position Points
13 M5O (G3LET) 1281 24 G3SWC 1065
32 G4LRP 984 37 G3WZT 901 HARC "B"
81 G4JHI 200 83 G3PYC 180 94 G8CKT 84

HARC "A" achieved 17th place and HARC "B" achieved 71st place in the CW Section of the 2014 AFS contest, out of a total entry of 87 club teams.  The HARC "A" team comprised G3LET, G3SWC, G3OGP and G3ZBU and the HARC "B" team comprised M0GJH and 2E0CVT.  The individual placings were G3LET 59th, G3SWC 67th, G3OGP 102nd, G3ZBU 141st, M0GJH 168th and 2E0CVT 227th out of a total entry of 245 individual stations.

HARC "A" achieved 18th place and HARC "B" achieved 67th place in the SSB section of the 2014 AFS contest, out of a total entry of 91 club teams.  The HARC "A" team comprised G3SWC, G4TPO, G3ZBU and G8CKT and the HARC "B" team comprised 2E0CVT and G3VQO.  The individual placings were G3SWC 55th, G4TPO 64th, G3ZBU 152nd, G8CKT 186th, 2E0CVT joint 192nd and G3VQO joint 192nd out of a total entry of 246 individual stations.

HARC achieved 7th place out of a total entry of 113 club teams in the 2012/2013 AFS Super League event.

HARC managed 10th place in the restricted section of the 2012 HF SSB Field Day out of 35 participating stations, having not entered the contest in 2013 or 2014.

About Amateur Radio in General

Visit the RSGB Home Page for weekly news bulletins, and everything you need to know about Amateur Radio in the UK.


PICTURE GALLERY

To view all the pictures, select all, and then scroll through until you find the one you want.  Alternatively, you can select one from the index below.  You can then scroll from the selected picture to any other.  As there are many pictures in the Gallery, they may take a little time to load, especially over a slow Internet link.  Please be patient.  When you have finished looking at the photos, press the "Pictures" button on the left to come back here, or press an appropriate button to go to a different section of the main page.

PICTURES INDEX

Titch                     A 3 1/2" gauge model steam locomotive ("Titch") built by Tony.
Dividing Head             Two views of a dividing head made by Tony for use on his lathe.
Vertical Steam Engine     Three views of a Stuart Vertical Steam Engine built by Tony.
Jubilee Sampler
An example of Anne's cross-stitch work. Group Photo A group of HARC members on a walking holiday in Wales.
Field Day
A picture of the operating position at an SSB Field Day Weekend.
Junk Sale
G3NPF and G3OGP auctioneering at a HARC Junk Sale.
War Memorial
The War Memorial in Thakeham Churchyard.
Village Sign
Village sign on the green beside the road into Washington.
QTH of G3NPF and M1AIM
Our house.
VHF Antennas
The VHF horizontal beam antennas at the QTH of Tony and Anne.
Main HF Antenna
The "Carolina Windom" at our QTH.
ATU
Remote automatic "Picatune" Antenna Tuning Unit.
Picatune revealed
A view inside the ATU Enclosure.
ATU Control Box
The "Picatune" Power Supply and Control Box.
Weights
Tensioning system for the Windom antenna.
Reserve HF Antenna
The 18AVT-WB vertical at our QTH.
Shack
The main G3NPF/M1AIM Shack.
View from shack
Part of the front garden, as seen from the shack window.
QSL Cards
G3NPF's standard and jubilee QSL Cards. As we were and as we are Pictures of Tony, Anne and the cat.
GB0CVS
A demonstration station manned by HARC members.
NOAA Satellite Image
An image obtained from the NOAA 15 weather satellite.
Meteor Satellite Image
An image obtained from the Meteor 3-05 weather satellite.

TECHNICAL ITEMS

To view a particular technical item, please select it from the index below.  Please note that there are a large number of small images, which may take a few minutes to load over a slow, dial-up Internet connection.  Consequently, the Technical Section has been divided into five separate sub-sections to avoid having to load the images relating to other unselected sub-sections.  When you have finished, press the "Technical" button on the left to come back here, or press an appropriate button to go to a different section of the main page.

TECHNICAL INDEX

A Guide to Home Construction         Some brief notes about home construction techniques.
GPS Derived Frequency Standard       Details of GPS derived frequency standard.
Power and Power Measurement          Some notes on power and power measurement techniques.
Frequency and Frequency Measurement  Some notes on frequency and frequency measurement techniques.
Antennas, Feeders, SWR and Matching
Some notes on antennas, feeders, SWR and matching. Resistors Descriptions, pictures and typical applications of resistors.
Capacitors
Descriptions, pictures and typical applications of capacitors. Inductors Descriptions, pictures and typical applications of inductors.
Transformers
Descriptions, pictures and typical applications of transformers. RF Connectors, Attenuators and Loads Descriptions, pictures and typical applications of RF connectors, attenuators and loads.

SOUND STUDIO

Enter the Sound Studio to see what sound-bites are available.  When you have entered the Sound Studio, you should hear a very brief introduction by G3NPF.  You can then scroll through the available sound-bites and select the one you want to hear.  Note that you can select a wanted sound-bite before, during, or after the introduction.  These files are available in either ".WAV" or ".MP3" format.  Some are fairly large and could take a while to download, particularly if your Internet link is slow.

When you have finished, press the "Sound-Bites" button on the left to come back here, or press an appropriate button to go to a different section of the main page.


HUMOUR

To view all the humourous articles, select all, and then scroll through until you find the one you want to read.  Alternatively, you can select one from the index below.  You can then scroll from the selected article to any other.  When you have finished smiling, press the "Humour" button on the left to come back here, or press an appropriate button to go to a different section of the main page.

HUMOUR INDEX

You might be an engineer if.....          Criteria for recognising an engineer.
You know you have had too much of
the 21st century when.....
Modern living. Why did the chicken cross the road? How management consultants make their money.
In the Beginning
Planning requirements of Local Authorities. Keeping up standards The standard railway gauge and its effect on space travel.
Engineers explained
An explanation of an engineer's thought processes. EU Regulations What could happen if the Brussels bureaucrats had their way.
The Story of Admiral Lord Nelson
2007 version, complient with modern regulations.
The Generation Gap How the thought processes of the young and old differ.
Politically Correct Season's Greetings Christmas greetings for the modern age. The Story of the Internet
The true story of how the Internet started. A Collection of Homilies Some very true sayings.

ODDS AND ENDS

To view all the items in this section, select all, and then scroll through until you find the one you want.  Alternatively, you can select one from the index below.  You can then scroll from the selected item to any other.  This section is devoted to all the bits and pieces that do not really fit into any of the other main sections.  When you have finished, press the "Odds and Ends" button on the left to come back here, or press an appropriate button to go to a different section of the main page.

ODDS AND ENDS INDEX

Armageddon is at hand....or is it?   How Amateur Radio has changed over the years.
Resistor Cube Problem
A puzzle that seems easy.  And it is, when you know how. Knowledge A Proverb.
HARC
The history of the Horsham Amateur Radio Club. The BADNET A brief history of this long standing 80m net.
Ethics Two ethical questions with unexpected answers.


CODES

When you have finished, press the "Codes" button on the left to come back here, or press an appropriate button to go to a different section of the main page.   Links are provided on these code pages to permit jumping from one page to another, without the need to return here.

CODES INDEX

Q-Codes            Full listing of all the Q-Codes.
Z-Codes
Full listing of all the Z-Codes. Morse Code A brief history of the Morse Code together with full listings for the
International Morse Code, the codes for the Russian, Greek, Hebrew and Arabic alphabets, accented letters used in other European Languages and in Esperanto. Procedural signals, the original land-line Morse Code used in the USA in the nineteenth century and the old US Navy "Morse" code are also defined.

Baudot Code
A brief history of the Baudot Code (also known as the Murray Code),
together with a full listing.
Emission Classes Full list, with explanations, of the three-character designators used to define all types of radio emissions.


SOFTWARE LIBRARY

If any of the links below do not work, please inform Tony, G3NPF via .  Please note that in order to reduce the amount of "spam", we have reluctantly been forced to block all e-mails with addresses at msn, aol, hotmail, bigfoot, yahoo, lycos, compuserve and hundreds of other less well known domains, except those belonging to known "friends".   We apologise for any inconvenience.

As there is such a vast range of Amateur Radio related software about these days, we have decided to only include links to programs that we have used and can recommend.  See "Legal Small Print" regarding copyright, trademarks and disclaimers etc.

WinPSKse       Dual channel PSK31 program.  Free for personal use.
DigiPan        Another dual channel PSK31 program.  Free for personal use.
MMSSTV
Slow-scan TV program.  Free for personal use. MMTTY Very good RTTY program. (Warning - The latest version does not support Cabrillo logging).  Free for personal use.
MMVARI
Excellent combined RTTY and PSK program. (Warning - The latest version does not support Cabrillo logging).  Free for personal use. EasyPal Digital slow-scan TV program. Free for personal use. WXtoImg The program for downloading weather satellite data that we prefer.
Usable Demo version is free for personal use, full version is expensive.
WxSat Another program for downloading weather satellite data. Free for personal use.
Orbitron Program for predicting satellite orbits.  Free for personal use.
WinOrbit Another program for predicting satellite orbits.  Free for personal use.
Super Duper RSGB preferred contest logging program, although rather crude by modern standards.  This program was free for personal use up to V14.30 but the author now charges a fee for registering later versions, although RSGB sponsored contests are still free, as registration is not required.
EchoLink Program for real time voice communication between radio amateurs over the
Internet, using voice-over-IP (VoIP) technology.  Free for personal use
eQSO Internet voice communication program, similar to EchoLink but having
several different and useful features.  Free for personal us
WSJT Weak signal communication program supporting FSK441, JT6M, JT44 and
EME Echo modes.  Free for personal use.
WSPR Weak signal receiving and transmitting program for propagation reporting activities.  Use in conjunction with facilities available at WSPRnet.org. Both programs are free for personal use.

There are hundreds of other freeware, shareware and normal commercial  programs to be had.  Try entering "amateur radio software" into a search engine to see the variety of programs that are available.  They range in quality from very poor to superb and in price from free to very expensive.  There are even more general interest, technical and engineering programs available for download from the Internet and they also range from excellent to dreadful and from free to expensive.  We have included the following links to a few programs that we have used and can recommend.  See "Legal Small Print" regarding copyright, trademarks and disclaimers etc.


SIMetrix Circuit simulation program.  Usable demo version is free, full version
is expensive.

Spectrogram
Low frequency spectrum analyser program.  Free for personal use. XVI32 Hexadecimal file editor.  Free for personal use.
ELSIE
Filter design program.  Free for personal use. Enigma Simulator Excellent simulation of the Enigma coding machine. EZNEC Antenna modelling and simulation program.  Usable demo version is free,
full version is fairly expensive.
FileZilla FTP program similar to CuteFTP.  Free for personal use.
MATCH
Matching network design program.  Free for personal use. 4nec2 An excellent and very comprehensive antenna modelling and simulation
program.  Quite difficult to learn but worth the effort.
Free for personal use.

Argo
"Waterfall" program for displaying slow, very long duration data.
Free for personal use.

AVG
Excellent anti-virus program requiring Windows XP or above.  Demo version is free but full version is fairly cheap and worth buying. Outpost Excellent personal firewall requiring Windows XP or above.  Demo version is free but full version is fairly cheap and worth buying.
Mailwasher
Excellent spam killer.  Usable demo version is free but full version is
fairly cheap and worth buying.
CCleaner A Windows registry cleaner that really works.  Free for personal use.
Valve Gear Design programs for steam locomotive valve gear.  Free for personal use.
File Splitter Program to split large files into floppy disc sized parts.
Free for personal use.

As a bit of nostalgia, we have included a few very simple programs, written by G3NPF back in the Commodore Plus-4/Amstrad 1640 days.  These programs are freeware, but G3NPF retains the copyright.  You are free to use, copy and redistribute them, provided no charge is made.  They were originally intended to run on MS-DOS machines using VGA displays, but they will run OK on computers using Windows 95/98/2000/XP and possibly on Windows Vista and Windows 7 but they have not been tested on those systems.  All the programs are compiled from originals written in QuickBasic 4.5.  G3NPF does not profess to be a writer of good code, but if you are interested in the BASIC versions, select the ".bas" filenames.  These must be run in the QuickBasic environment.  Select the ".txt" option to obtain a zipped text version of the basic code.  It is not elegant programming, but it works!!

easter.exe (easter.bas) (.txt)        Calculates the date of Easter.
daydate.exe (daydate.bas) (.txt)
Gives the day for a given date. atten.exe (atten.bas) (.txt) Designs "T" or "PI" attenuators.
locate13.exe (locate13.bas) (.txt)
Converts between NGR, Lat/Long and QTH/QRA/WAB Locators. (Note that there is a virus called "locate.exe", which must not be confused with this programme. Hence the version number being included in the file name).

Many years ago, I started teaching myself to use Visual Basic 3.0.  My first attempt at using it was to write a Windows version of easter.exe.  I have not done any more for some time and I think I have now forgotten all I had learned!!  You must have VBRUN300.DLL in your WINDOWS\SYSTEM directory to run this program.  It is probably already there, but if not, you can download it from here.

easter-w.exe     A Windows program to calculate the date of Easter.

Perhaps, one day I will write a really useful program.  If and when that happens, it will be included on this site, but don't hold your breath!!


LEGAL "SMALL PRINT"

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G3NPF and M1AIM do not accept responsibility for any occurrences arising from the use of information obtained from this Internet Web Site or from any other site linked to it, nor do they have any pecuniary or other interest in any of the companies or commercial organisations linked to, or mentioned on, this site.  You are strongly advised to virus check any file downloaded from the Internet.

The copyright of all material created by G3NPF and M1AIM remains the property of the originators but you are free to use, copy or distribute it, provided the content is not modified in any way, the authorship and source are acknowledged and no charge, apart from postage and media costs, is made.

 ©  2000    G3NPF & M1AIM     E&OE